Keyword: School of Music

Alumni in Their Own Words - Nicole Richard Williams

Nicole Richard graduated from CMU in 2013 with a Bachelor of Music Therapy.

Where has your life taken you since you left CMU?

After finishing my Bachelor of Music Therapy at CMU, I worked as a music therapist in Winnipeg for about three years. During this time, I started working with many clients on the autism spectrum and noticed that doing rhythmic and drumming interventions with these folks really seemed to help them reach some of their therapeutic goals. I wanted to deepen my understanding of how exactly music therapy could help autistic children. Going to grad school had always been a dream of mine, and so I decided to take some time off working to do a Master's in Music and Health Science at the University of Toronto. During that degree, I decided I wanted to continue on and do a PhD and was accepted again at the Music and Health Science Research Collaboratory (the lab out of which the master's and PhD are based) at the University of Toronto.

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Violinist wins the 19th annual Verna Mae Janzen Competition

The 19th annual Verna Mae Janzen Music Competition at Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) reached a rousing crescendo this year, as the night's final performer, William Harder, was awarded first place.

The Winnipeg violinist says, "It is really rewarding to have some very tangible recognition for all of the work that gets put into practicing music."

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2024 Verna Mae Janzen Music Competition (video and photos)

View the full performance of each finalist, hear the jurors' comments, and learn the outcome of the competition.

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From napkin sketch to piano concerto: two CMU students' collaborative journey

What began as a student's rough sketch on a napkin has now grown into a sweeping piano concerto commissioned by the Mennonite Community Orchestra (MCO).

Written by Liam Berry and performed by Georg Neuhofer, "Rains Dance" is a piece that carries great significance for the two Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) students. It's the consolidation of musical congeniality, collaboration, and years of friendship.

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New Indigenous opera is a story of good medicine

This fall, Manitoba Opera will be performing the world premiere of Li Keur: Riel's Heart of the North, the first full-scale Indigenous-led opera presented on a Canadian mainstage. It celebrates Métis women, languages, music, and culture, with libretto written by Métis poet and scholar Dr. Suzanne Steele and music composed by Métis fiddler Alex Kusturok and CMU faculty Neil Weisensel.

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Pianist wins 2023 Verna Mae Janzen Music Competition

A pianist from Inglis, Manitoba is the winner of the 18th annual Verna Mae Janzen Music Competition at Canadian Mennonite University (CMU).

Georg Neuhofer's performance in the finals, held on Thursday, March 23 in CMU's Laudamus Auditorium, earned him first place and the $700 prize that comes with it.

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2023 Verna Mae Janzen Music Competition (video, photos)

View the full performance of each finalist, hear the jurors' comments, and learn the outcome of the competition.

Continue Reading

Faculty-alumni collaboration explores decolonizing music education in the classroom

Studying music education means learning scales and chord progressions, practicing how to move your hands while conducting, and planning out class schedules. But sometimes it also involves examining and re-evaluating the entire education system at its core.

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Pianist wins 2022 Verna Mae Janzen Music Competition

A pianist from Fort Frances, Ontario is the winner of the 17th annual Verna Mae Janzen Music Competition at Canadian Mennonite University (CMU).

Anna Schwartz's performance in the finals, held on Friday, April 8 in CMU's Laudamus Auditorium, earned her first place and the $700 prize that comes with it.

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CMU student and instructor make music come alive through synesthesia, art

Imagine if you could see sound. When Anna Schwartz listens to music, she not only hears the different instruments, keys, and dynamics—she sees them. That's because she has synesthesia, a neurological condition in which information entering a person's brain stimulates multiple senses at once.

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